Engine Bay Tidying

I spent some more time this afternoon cleaning up the engine bay and the steering column and engine block, which still had a lot of greasy dirt on them.
Here is the engine bay before I started.

I wrapped the oil filter mount in aluminum foil to keep it from getting soiled.

I started with the steering column and shift linkage as well as the steering box, spraying them with Simple Green, which is a great de-greaser and cleaner.

I used a small wire brush to scrub the nooks and crannies of the linkages.

That worked pretty well at removing most of the gunk from the steering column and box.

So I went to work on the engine block on the passenger side, which is now accessible with the removal of the generator.

After some time the area was much cleaner.

Engine Bay Grommets

I plan to replace all of the firewall and fender rubber grommets in the engine bay. Some are just missing and others are dried up, crusty, or falling apart. The first step was to inventory all of the holes in the engine bay that need grommets to get a sense for what size I need to order and the quantities of each.  I used my calipers to measure the diameter of each hole in the engine bay so I can get the right sized replacements.
This post serves as a photo record of the engine bay grommets, starting in the front driver’s side corner, working my way back around the firewall toward the passenger side and back down the inner fender on that side. The area with torn metal that is bare in spots I believe is where the fuel filter bracket originally hung.
The first was down on the lower inner driver’s side fender.  The diameter of this hole was 3/4″

Moving back in the direction of the firewall, another grommet in the fuel line hole just over the wheel well.  This hole was 1 1/4″ in diameter.  Also shown in this photo, further back on the same fender from the fuel line grommet (near the steering column linkage) was another grommet in a hole in the fender with a 1 1/8″ diameter.

In the upper firewall above the shelf and next to the hood hinge, there was another grommet, this one in 1 1/8″ diameter hole.  Shown also in this picture is another hole, located to the right of the first one in the upper fender (without a grommet).  That hole was 7/8″ in diameter.

Then, pictured just to the right of the master cylinders, two small holes for the hood release (1/2″ diameter) and choke cable (3/4″).

And another small one on the other side of the steering column, 5/8″ in diameter.

Two grommets for the heater core inlet and outlet, each 1 1/8″ in size.

There were two more large holes in the firewall to the left of the heater core. I later determined that these were not original, had been drilled by a previous owner, and plan to weld them up.

On the passenger side of the engine bay, also up high above the fuse box near the hood hinge, was a larger hole with grommet for the engine bay wiring harness.  That one was 1 1/8″.

Another hole was located in the lower fender with grommet for the brake line.  That hole was 1 1/8″ in diameter.

And closer to the front of the engine bay in the upper fender over above the battery shelf, was a small 5/8″ diameter hole and grommet.  Not shown, there was another hole identical in size to this one on the opposite fender.

Below is a diagram I created of all of the engine bay holes that require grommets in my 1964 L320. The letters represent the different grommet sizes.  This should be reasonably consistent with 320s from other years.

E-1 Distributor Pics

Here are a few pictures of the original E-1 distributor mounted on the truck, located on the passenger side of the engine block just behind the oil filter mount.
Here are two with the distributor cap on.

And one showing under the distributor cap.

I’ve found it really difficult to locate replacement parts for the E-1 distributor, and distributor caps, rotors, and points from the J13 distributor don’t seem to swap over. So I’m not planning to make any changes to the distributor before I get the truck running. Then I may try to do some updating.

Engine Scrubbing–Electrical/Ignition Side

This afternoon I spent more time scrubbing the engine on the passenger side where the generator, distributor, spark plugs, and oil filter are located. I did this in phases in between removing the heater hoses and the generator. The engine block on that side was covered in a thick coating of engine and road grime. I also went back over to the other side of the engine bay to work on cleaning up the steering column and shift linkage.
I decided to reinstall the oil filter with a protective layer of aluminum foil to keep the dirt and debris from infiltrating the oil filter tower and possibly getting into the engine internals.

Then I reinstalled oil filter housing the mounting bolt and threaded it into the base on the engine.

I wet the engine block down and sprayed it with some Simple Green. Then I scrubbed with a heavy duty Scotch Brite pad.

After a few rounds of scrubbing the engine began to look a bit better.

I was very careful with the water around the distributor, but after some scrubbing was able to reveal the engine number on that side of the block.

On the front half of the engine, passenger side, I liberally sprayed with Simple Green and used a heavy wire brush to clean the block and the area around the engine mounts.

After a good rinse the engine looks much better over there, even revealing the original blue-green color of the engine block.

I went to work on the steering column; the bottom where the steering box is located was covered in a thick coat of greasy grime.

And the upper section where the shift linkage connects to was also pretty filthy, but it cleaned up nicely.

Here is the cleaned-up steering box.

Generator Removal

Today I removed the generator from the engine. Previously I started the process by detaching the adjuster arm that allows the generator pulley to act as a tensioner on the fan belt. What remain are the generator bracket that bolts into the oil filter/distributor side of the engine block and various electrical connections.
The bracket is attached to the block by four bolts. I used a 1/2″ socket in my wrench to loosen those bolts.

The lower rear (firewall side) bolt served a dual purpose, also attaching the battery ground cable to the engine block. After removing everything I put the ground back into place and loosely threaded in that bolt to make sure I put it back during reassembly.

Then I was able to liberate the generator from the engine block, with the mounting bracket still attached to the generator.

Here is a picture of the generator’s electrical connections.

Here are shown the two bolts that connect the generator to the mounting bracket. The bracket has holes on either ear, and the generator has two flanges, one just behind the pulley and one at the opposite end, which both have mounting holes.

I used a 1/2″ socket and a ratcheting wrench to remove the first mounting bolt from the pulley-end of the generator.

Then I removed the nut from the mounting bolt on the opposite side of the generator.

Which released the mounting bracket from the generator.

Here are a couple of shots of the generator mounting bracket.

Heater Hose Removal

Today I spent some time tidying up the engine bay. I removed the old heater hose which snaked from the rear of the engine block around toward the front.

The set-up was a bit curious, because there were no hoses connected to the heater core through the firewall. Also, since the engine came with what I believe to be the original cast iron fuel pump, which doesn’t have an outlet for a hose to the heater core, I plan to rationalize/correct/simplify the routing of heater hoses when I put this all back together. Namely, the outlet at the rear of the block will be connected via a short length of 1/2″ heater hose into the lower inlet of the heater core.

Then another longer section of heater hose will snake out of the upper heater core outlet, around the valve cover on the left side and turn right next to the thermostat housing and then run down into a new inlet connect on the new water pump.

Fuel Pump Options

Since I got the truck I’ve been trying to figure out a replacement mechanical fuel pump. Previously I mentioned one of the possibilities, which was to get a newer fuel pump for a more common L-series Datsun engine and modify it to fit the E-series engine.
Here is a picture of the original, OEM fuel pump that came on the E-1 engines, complete with tin-man styling and a cool priming lever (picture originally posted on Ratsun by Steve).

And here is a shot of the Nikki fuel pump that was on my truck when I got it. I am fairly certain this is a J-series engine fuel pump such as those found on the engines of the 520 and 521 trucks that followed the 320 in the Datsun line-up beginning in late 1965. Note the angle and length of the fuel pump arm are similar to the original E-series pump above.

I found and bought an L-series fuel pump. This is the pump that was found on 510s, 240zs, and 610 and later Datsun trucks, so they tend to be more readily available than either the E-series or J-series pumps. As shown below, the mounting surface and bolt-hole spacing between the J- and L-series pumps are identical, which is promising.

But clearly the arms are different in size and angle (L-series pump left, J-series right).

And the L-series pump is a Kyosan Denki whereas the J-series is a Nikki.

The fuel pump arms are mounted into the body by a pin. I was unsuccessful trying to press out the pin on either of the pumps, so I will need to take this to a machine shop to see if they have any luck swapping the arm from my E-1 compatible J13 pump onto the brand new L-series fuel pump.

British Engine Gaskets

In addition to the J13 Engine Gasket Set I ordered, I also ordered some gaskets from Moss Motors for the British B-series engine, found on the MGA and MGBs. Early Datsuns were produced with a licensed version of the B-series engine and the E-1 has that lineage, so many of the British engine parts cross over to the E-series engines.

I ordered two lines of valve cover gaskets from Moss, the first made of cork and the second a more durable silicone. The J13 valve cover gasket shown below at the top of both pictures is the one with the holes for the valve cover mounting screws, which is how the J13 and later (1964-65) 320s fixed their valve covers to the head. The earlier 320 valve covers did not have these six screws and were mounted by two large bolts through the top of the valve cover. The cork version is Moss Motors part #296-310 and was about $2. The red silicone version was part #296-311 and was $17.

The side cover/inspection cover gaskets that came with the J13 gasket set were made of cork. The same silicone valve cover gasket shown above from Moss also comes in a kit with a pair of red silicone inspection cover gaskets for less than $20 for all three pieces, part #296-425. Here are some shots of the J13 inspection cover gaskets compared to the B-series silicone versions.

Furthermore, Moss sells a very nice, U.S.-made exhaust manifold gasket that is a perfect match for the E-1 engine. Part #297-535 was $9. Compare to the J13 version below.

J13 Engine Gasket Set

I ordered a full J13 engine gasket set from RockAuto and it arrived this week.  The 1.3 liter J13 engine came in the later 520 and 521 trucks and 411 cars from 1965-1969, but I expect that many/most of the gaskets will fit the E-1 engine. The set is Victor Reinz part #HS3597.
Here is a shot of the gasket set and its contents:

Below I will inventory the gaskets included for posterity.
Valve stem seals:

Valve cover and inspection cover gaskets:

Combination intake/exhaust manifold gasket (note that it is a perfect fit for the E-1 manifolds):

Carburetor insulator block

Note that the J13 insulator (right) has a single large oval-shaped opening to match the J13 intake whereas the E-1 intake manifold and insulator (left) has two separate circular openings:

There were the two intake/exhaust manifold gaskets. The slightly larger one is the hot spot gasket that mounts on top of the exhaust manifold and mates to the underside of the intake manifold (same gasket shown in both pics below).

Water pump gasket:

Fuel pump gaskets (two, one goes on either side of the fuel pump spacer, not included in this kit). These gaskets are also available separately, Beck/Arnley part #039-2008. Likewise, the fuel pump spacer is Beck/Arnley part #039-2002.

Thermostat tower gasket (also Beck/Arnley part #039-0004):

And, importantly here is the J13 head gasket: