New Air Cleaner

The original air cleaner that came on my truck had been modified at some point. The “horn” inlet had been cut off. See below:

These modifications were pretty common, but I wanted to get an intact stock air cleaner to put back on the truck. A couple of years ago I cut out a small swatch of my stock air cleaner to use it as a sample to get some paint mixed in Datsun air cleaner blue.
Earlier this year I was able to acquire a replacement stock air cleaner from a 1964 320 that someone was parting out. It is in good shape, but has clearly been repainted at some point.

The inside of the new air cleaner had also been painted, but the lid was its original blue.

I used some Metal Prep and a Scotch Brite pad to address the surface rust, which was mostly on the lid.

Then I sprayed some Rustoleum white Clean Metal Primer on the air cleaner.

Here are the air cleaner body and lid in white primer.

I opened the can of paint Ace Rust Stop paint I had custom-matched to air cleaner blue and stirred it thoroughly.

In order to make the paint flow better and hopefully self-level, I added in around 15% of Penetrol and stirred that in really well.

I started with the lid, just using a foam brush to coat the inside of the lid and the wingnut and other accessories.

After the paint dried, I flipped over the lid and painted the outside.

The air cleaner body had a rubber gasket inside the area where the bottom of the air cleaner mates to the top of the carburetor. Here are some shots of that gasket from the bottom of the air cleaner looking up (left) and from the inside of the air cleaner (right).

As you can see, the gasket has a lip that rests on the underside of the air cleaner. I used a screwdriver to work the gasket down from the inside of the air cleaner out the bottom.

When I got the gasket out it was crusty, the rubber hardened, and broken in several places.

Here is some detail on the top of the gasket where it aligns with the air cleaner lip that tightens around the mouth of the carburetor.

With that rubber piece out I moved on to painting the body of the air cleaner, also just using a foam brush.

Steering Column Paint

Last year I spent some time and effort cleaning all of the grease and grime off of the steering column and shift linkage, as well as the steering box.

Today I finally got around to painting those parts black. I wasn’t able to find a small can of semi-gloss paint, so I made my own by mixing equal parts of Rustoleum oil-based Stops Rust paint gloss black and flat black. I mixed the two sheens of black together in a cup, stirring them very thoroughly.

Then I just used a foam brush to apply the paint, starting at the bottom with the steering box and working my way up.

At the top where the column shift linkage is located there are a lot of moving parts, so I was careful to paint as many surfaces as I could access, turning the steering wheel and adjusting the shifter to reveal unpainted surfaces so I could paint them.

When I was finished the columns looked much better.

Steering Column Grommet Removal

Today the weather warmed up a bit and I was able to get outside and do some work on the truck. I pulled the steering column grommet out of the firewall. Mine is in really rough shape and I’d like to replace it, though I haven’t had much luck finding a replacement part.
Here’s the engine bay:

The steering column grommet is a boot that mounts into a cone-shaped hole in the firewall and has two holes; one for the steering column and another for the shift linkage column. I’ve seen pictures of some of these in decent shape. They angle downward parallel to the steering column outwards an inch or so. Here’s a close-up of what remains of my grommet. The bottom lip part that mounts into the firewall is intact, but the boot section that encloses the columns is gone.

I used a flat head screwdriver to pry the grommet from the firewall opening.

Clearly the grommet wouldn’t come free without removing the steering and shifter columns, so I cut the rubber with a pair of scissors.

Then I was able to pull it off.

Here are some detail shots of the top and bottom of the steering column grommet.

Here is a close-up of the profile of the grommet where it mounts to the firewall.

New Paint in the Engine Bay

Last week I cleaned up and prepped the right and left inner fenders in the engine bay. Today I spent the morning repainting the inner fenders.
Ordinarily the best way to paint an engine bay is to remove the engine and all of the ancillaries to prevent overspray. That isn’t in the cards for this project. So the next best alternative for me was to mask off the areas I didn’t want covered in red paint. I used some blue painters tape, newspaper for the larger areas, and aluminum foil, which I was able to form around the less-uniformly shaped areas and components.
I used blue tape to delineate the lower fender from the upper (which I’m not painting) and used foil to cover up the fuel line, brake line, and choke and accelerator cables.

I used the blue tape to cover up the corner of the firewall where it meets the fender and foil to cover the suspension.

Next I used a lot of newspaper to mask off the upper fender, external fender, engine, master cylinders, and front grille area.

The paint I’m using comes from APS Tower Paint in Wisconsin. That company will match just about any vehicle’s paint color from the color code your provide, including a 1964 Datsun. The color of my truck is Hustler Red, and Tower Paint sent me a spraycan of acrylic enamel paint for around $35. In total on this truck I used two cans of paint.

Following the directions on the can, I shook and rotated the can thoroughly and then applied a thin coat of paint, being careful to avoid runs.

After two more coats the color looked very nice.

Then I moved on to the left fender. It was a bit more complex, with more electrical wiring and the battery tray over there.

I used aluminum foil to encase the wiring harnesses and blue tape to mask off the upper fender and the firewall.

Then I used a lot more newspaper to cover the engine, distributor, oil filter mount, firewall, upper fender, and front panel. All that remained exposed was that lower inner fender area that was in the worst shape.

I also made sure to mask off the outside of the fender to avoid any overspray there.

Here is the left fender after the first light coat of Hustler Red.

And a couple more after subsequent coats.

After the paint dried overnight I removed all of the masking. Here are the finished right and left fenders.

And here is a shot of the renewed engine bay. The color turned out to be a really good match to the shiny exterior paint.

After painting the fenders I primed and painted the fuel filter bracket I removed from the engine bay.
The bracket was pretty rusty so I used a 3M stripping wheel in my drill to remove the rust.

After a coat of Metal Prep, I used some Rustoleum white clean metal primer.

Then I sprayed a couple of coats of Hustler Red on the bracket.

Right Inner Fender Cleaning

I spent this afternoon cleaning up and addressing surface rust on the right inner fender. This side has considerably more going on than the left side, so it was a more involved process.
Near the front the single hard fuel line emerges into the engine bay. At that point the fuel continues through a combination of soft rubber lines through the fuel filter and on to the mechanical fuel pump. I started by loosening the hose clamp and removing the rubber hose and plastic fuel filter from the end of the hard line.

Then I used a thin flat-head screwdriver to pry out the rubber grommet surrounding the fuel line hole. I will replace that grommet later.

About midway back was an L-shaped bracket attached to the fender by machine screws. This is the mount for the original glass-jar style fuel filter assembly (which is gone), but as far as I can tell this bracket would have originally been located closer to the front of the engine bay where the fuel line enters. I removed the bracket using a flat-head screwdriver.

Here’s a shot of the place where the bracket was located (note it was about as far back as the shock absorber below) and one of the bracket after I removed it.

Lower on the fender, and further back toward the firewall, there was another hole and grommet for the hard brake line that feeds hydraulic fluid to the front driver’s side brakes. I pried off that grommet also and removed it.

Here’s a look at some of the surface rust on the inner fender, at its worst down low near the suspension.

I sprayed the entire lower fender with Simple Green and used a Scotch Brite pad to clean away the grease and grime.

After a lot of scrubbing the fender looked much better.

I used a 150-grit sanding sponge to sand down the fender, focusing particularly on the areas with surface rust.

When I finished, the fender was much duller in sheen but the rust looked much less threatening.

I used some Metal Prep and a fresh Scotch Brite pad to scrub the exposed bare steel and any remaining surface rust.

The bare metal looked a healthy silver, rather than rusty-brown, when I finished.

Left Inner Fender Cleaning

While the exterior of my truck has clearly been repainted at some point and looks very nice, the engine bay is a bit of a mess. As I do the mechanical overhaul, I also would like to make sheet metal repairs and remove the rust from the engine bay. To that end, I spent this morning cleaning up, sanding down, and removing surface rust from the inside of the left front fender. There is no serious rust, other than the just behind the battery tray where it clearly rusted through at one point. That area appears to be very stable now.

Before I started cleaning, I did my best to pull the wires from the engine bay wiring harness up and away from the fenders to keep them from getting wet.

Then I used a spray bottle to spray some Simple Green onto the fender, and a green Scotch Brite pad to scrub the fender.

After some time and elbow grease, the fender started to look a lot better.

After the metal was clean, it became clear that there was some surface rust pitting the fender, particularly in the area of the battery tray. I used a 150-grit sanding pad to remove the paint and surface rust in those areas.

Then I applied some Metal Prep to another Scotch Brite pad and scrubbed it into the bare metal where I had sanded away the red paint. The Metal Prep chemically neutralizes any remaining rust and also leaves a thin, rust-inhibiting coating on the metal which helps to prevent future rust. I wiped away the excess solution using shop towels so it wouldn’t run down the panel or dry too thick.

Here are a couple of pictures of the left fender after I finished cleaning it up and treating the rust. The bare metal that has been treated takes on a whitish-grey tone because the protective film is almost chalky.

Disconnected the Generator

This morning I disconnected and finally removed the generator from the engine bay. I mechanically freed the generator last month, but it remained attached to the wiring harness until today.
Here is a record of the three electrical connections to the generator: black wire, white wire with black stripe, and white wire with red stripe. I’m not 100% certain this is how the wiring came from the factory, but it’s how I got it and will be the starting point when I reinstall the generator.

I used a 9 mm socket to remove the bolt that held the black wire in place.

The other two wires were mounted on studs with a lower nut and an upper nut sandwiching the wire connector onto each stud. For each of those, I used a 1/2″ socket on my socket wrench to loosen the top nut while holding the lower nut in place with a wrench.
I started with the white wire/black stripe.

And then did the white wire/red stripe.

I labeled the wiring harness so someday I can put this all back together.

And here is the generator, finally removed from the engine bay.

Generator Bracket Painting

This afternoon I primed and painted the mounting bracket for the generator (or dynamo, as it is called in my factor service manual).
The bracket is L-shaped with four bold holes to mount to the engine on the front of the engine block, passenger side. After removing the generator from the bracket and cleaning it up, it was obvious that the bracket had originally been painted the same Datsun blue as the engine itself and many of the other parts around the engine bay.

For primer I used some Rustoleum white clean metal spray on all sides of the bracket.

For the finish coat I used the same blue Datsun engine paint I’ve been using throughout the engine bay, which I bought from California Datsun on ebay. I hung the bracket using some cotton string from a tree branch so I could apply a light coat of color to all sides of the bracket while it spun in the wind.

The warm August temperatures helped the paint dry quickly, and I applied a second coat shortly after the first one.

Horn Painting

This morning I spent some time painting the horns that I removed from the engine bay and cleaned up yesterday. Once again, I believe these are the stock horns, but OEM horns came with small domes over reach of the horns. I need to find out more information on this and may try to replace these horns with original ones if I can.
Here are the horns, cleaned up and stripped of rust, and treated with Metal Prep.

I used a little masking tape to cover the brass electrical terminals on each horn and then sprayed on some Rustoleum clean-metal white primer on each side of each horn.

I used some Rustoleum semi-gloss black enamel spray paint.

I sprayed on two coats on each side of the horns.

Horn Removal

This afternoon I removed and cleaned up the horns from the engine bay.  The 320 has two horns, one is a high tone and the other is a low tone.  Only one of the two is typically connected at a time, so you have a choice.
Here are the horns.  They are located on the passenger side of the engine bay, mounted on the frame just below and forward of the battery.  I believe these are the stock horns, but originally they would have had domes over the tops of them; these horns are naked.

I used a 1/2″ socket in my wrench to remove the single bolt that goes through flanges in both horns and attaches them to a bracket on the frame.

Here’s the bolt.

I labeled the green wire from the wiring harness, which will stay in the engine bay, and disconnected it from another short wire attached to the horn.

This is the bracket where the horns were mounted, just beside the passenger-side engine mount.

The horns were covered in dirt, grime, and some rust.

I used a wire wheel in my drill to start cleaning them up.

The difference was night-and-day.

I cleaned up both horns using the same approach.

Then I scrubbed each of them with some metal-prep, which should help to prevent any new rust from forming for a while.

Inside of each horn is an “L” for low tone and “H” for the high tone horn. I plan to try to bench test these at some point, and paint them before reinstalling.