Generator Bracket Painting

This afternoon I primed and painted the mounting bracket for the generator (or dynamo, as it is called in my factor service manual).
The bracket is L-shaped with four bold holes to mount to the engine on the front of the engine block, passenger side. After removing the generator from the bracket and cleaning it up, it was obvious that the bracket had originally been painted the same Datsun blue as the engine itself and many of the other parts around the engine bay.

For primer I used some Rustoleum white clean metal spray on all sides of the bracket.

For the finish coat I used the same blue Datsun engine paint I’ve been using throughout the engine bay, which I bought from California Datsun on ebay. I hung the bracket using some cotton string from a tree branch so I could apply a light coat of color to all sides of the bracket while it spun in the wind.

The warm August temperatures helped the paint dry quickly, and I applied a second coat shortly after the first one.

Horn Painting

This morning I spent some time painting the horns that I removed from the engine bay and cleaned up yesterday. Once again, I believe these are the stock horns, but OEM horns came with small domes over reach of the horns. I need to find out more information on this and may try to replace these horns with original ones if I can.
Here are the horns, cleaned up and stripped of rust, and treated with Metal Prep.

I used a little masking tape to cover the brass electrical terminals on each horn and then sprayed on some Rustoleum clean-metal white primer on each side of each horn.

I used some Rustoleum semi-gloss black enamel spray paint.

I sprayed on two coats on each side of the horns.

Horn Removal

This afternoon I removed and cleaned up the horns from the engine bay.  The 320 has two horns, one is a high tone and the other is a low tone.  Only one of the two is typically connected at a time, so you have a choice.
Here are the horns.  They are located on the passenger side of the engine bay, mounted on the frame just below and forward of the battery.  I believe these are the stock horns, but originally they would have had domes over the tops of them; these horns are naked.

I used a 1/2″ socket in my wrench to remove the single bolt that goes through flanges in both horns and attaches them to a bracket on the frame.

Here’s the bolt.

I labeled the green wire from the wiring harness, which will stay in the engine bay, and disconnected it from another short wire attached to the horn.

This is the bracket where the horns were mounted, just beside the passenger-side engine mount.

The horns were covered in dirt, grime, and some rust.

I used a wire wheel in my drill to start cleaning them up.

The difference was night-and-day.

I cleaned up both horns using the same approach.

Then I scrubbed each of them with some metal-prep, which should help to prevent any new rust from forming for a while.

Inside of each horn is an “L” for low tone and “H” for the high tone horn. I plan to try to bench test these at some point, and paint them before reinstalling.

Engine Bay Tidying

I spent some more time this afternoon cleaning up the engine bay and the steering column and engine block, which still had a lot of greasy dirt on them.
Here is the engine bay before I started.

I wrapped the oil filter mount in aluminum foil to keep it from getting soiled.

I started with the steering column and shift linkage as well as the steering box, spraying them with Simple Green, which is a great de-greaser and cleaner.

I used a small wire brush to scrub the nooks and crannies of the linkages.

That worked pretty well at removing most of the gunk from the steering column and box.

So I went to work on the engine block on the passenger side, which is now accessible with the removal of the generator.

After some time the area was much cleaner.

Engine Bay Grommets

I plan to replace all of the firewall and fender rubber grommets in the engine bay. Some are just missing and others are dried up, crusty, or falling apart. The first step was to inventory all of the holes in the engine bay that need grommets to get a sense for what size I need to order and the quantities of each.  I used my calipers to measure the diameter of each hole in the engine bay so I can get the right sized replacements.
This post serves as a photo record of the engine bay grommets, starting in the front driver’s side corner, working my way back around the firewall toward the passenger side and back down the inner fender on that side. The area with torn metal that is bare in spots I believe is where the fuel filter bracket originally hung.
The first was down on the lower inner driver’s side fender.  The diameter of this hole was 3/4″

Moving back in the direction of the firewall, another grommet in the fuel line hole just over the wheel well.  This hole was 1 1/4″ in diameter.  Also shown in this photo, further back on the same fender from the fuel line grommet (near the steering column linkage) was another grommet in a hole in the fender with a 1 1/8″ diameter.

In the upper firewall above the shelf and next to the hood hinge, there was another grommet, this one in 1 1/8″ diameter hole.  Shown also in this picture is another hole, located to the right of the first one in the upper fender (without a grommet).  That hole was 7/8″ in diameter.

Then, pictured just to the right of the master cylinders, two small holes for the hood release (1/2″ diameter) and choke cable (3/4″).

And another small one on the other side of the steering column, 5/8″ in diameter.

Two grommets for the heater core inlet and outlet, each 1 1/8″ in size.

There were two more large holes in the firewall to the left of the heater core. I later determined that these were not original, had been drilled by a previous owner, and plan to weld them up.

On the passenger side of the engine bay, also up high above the fuse box near the hood hinge, was a larger hole with grommet for the engine bay wiring harness.  That one was 1 1/8″.

Another hole was located in the lower fender with grommet for the brake line.  That hole was 1 1/8″ in diameter.

And closer to the front of the engine bay in the upper fender over above the battery shelf, was a small 5/8″ diameter hole and grommet.  Not shown, there was another hole identical in size to this one on the opposite fender.

Below is a diagram I created of all of the engine bay holes that require grommets in my 1964 L320. The letters represent the different grommet sizes.  This should be reasonably consistent with 320s from other years.

E-1 Distributor Pics

Here are a few pictures of the original E-1 distributor mounted on the truck, located on the passenger side of the engine block just behind the oil filter mount.
Here are two with the distributor cap on.

And one showing under the distributor cap.

I’ve found it really difficult to locate replacement parts for the E-1 distributor, and distributor caps, rotors, and points from the J13 distributor don’t seem to swap over. So I’m not planning to make any changes to the distributor before I get the truck running. Then I may try to do some updating.

Engine Scrubbing–Electrical/Ignition Side

This afternoon I spent more time scrubbing the engine on the passenger side where the generator, distributor, spark plugs, and oil filter are located. I did this in phases in between removing the heater hoses and the generator. The engine block on that side was covered in a thick coating of engine and road grime. I also went back over to the other side of the engine bay to work on cleaning up the steering column and shift linkage.
I decided to reinstall the oil filter with a protective layer of aluminum foil to keep the dirt and debris from infiltrating the oil filter tower and possibly getting into the engine internals.

Then I reinstalled oil filter housing the mounting bolt and threaded it into the base on the engine.

I wet the engine block down and sprayed it with some Simple Green. Then I scrubbed with a heavy duty Scotch Brite pad.

After a few rounds of scrubbing the engine began to look a bit better.

I was very careful with the water around the distributor, but after some scrubbing was able to reveal the engine number on that side of the block.

On the front half of the engine, passenger side, I liberally sprayed with Simple Green and used a heavy wire brush to clean the block and the area around the engine mounts.

After a good rinse the engine looks much better over there, even revealing the original blue-green color of the engine block.

I went to work on the steering column; the bottom where the steering box is located was covered in a thick coat of greasy grime.

And the upper section where the shift linkage connects to was also pretty filthy, but it cleaned up nicely.

Here is the cleaned-up steering box.

Generator Removal

Today I removed the generator from the engine. Previously I started the process by detaching the adjuster arm that allows the generator pulley to act as a tensioner on the fan belt. What remain are the generator bracket that bolts into the oil filter/distributor side of the engine block and various electrical connections.
The bracket is attached to the block by four bolts. I used a 1/2″ socket in my wrench to loosen those bolts.

The lower rear (firewall side) bolt served a dual purpose, also attaching the battery ground cable to the engine block. After removing everything I put the ground back into place and loosely threaded in that bolt to make sure I put it back during reassembly.

Then I was able to liberate the generator from the engine block, with the mounting bracket still attached to the generator.

Here is a picture of the generator’s electrical connections.

Here are shown the two bolts that connect the generator to the mounting bracket. The bracket has holes on either ear, and the generator has two flanges, one just behind the pulley and one at the opposite end, which both have mounting holes.

I used a 1/2″ socket and a ratcheting wrench to remove the first mounting bolt from the pulley-end of the generator.

Then I removed the nut from the mounting bolt on the opposite side of the generator.

Which released the mounting bracket from the generator.

Here are a couple of shots of the generator mounting bracket.

Heater Hose Removal

Today I spent some time tidying up the engine bay. I removed the old heater hose which snaked from the rear of the engine block around toward the front.

The set-up was a bit curious, because there were no hoses connected to the heater core through the firewall. Also, since the engine came with what I believe to be the original cast iron fuel pump, which doesn’t have an outlet for a hose to the heater core, I plan to rationalize/correct/simplify the routing of heater hoses when I put this all back together. Namely, the outlet at the rear of the block will be connected via a short length of 1/2″ heater hose into the lower inlet of the heater core.

Then another longer section of heater hose will snake out of the upper heater core outlet, around the valve cover on the left side and turn right next to the thermostat housing and then run down into a new inlet connect on the new water pump.