Engine Scrubbing–Fuel/Air Side

After pulling the intake/exhaust manifold from the engine I spent some time cleaning the engine block on that newly accessible side.
It was definitely pretty cruddy with 50+ years of engine and road grime.

I used some Simple Green, which I’ve always found to be a very effective de-greaser, to loosen up the grime.

I used a heavy-duty scrub brush. The original color of the engine block started to come through.

I also used a rough Brillo-style nylon scrubber, working it in around the shift linkage and steering column, and even around the engine mounts.

I even cleaned off the inspection covers pretty well. Here’s the payoff.  Not perfect, but much-improved.

Manifold & Oil Filter Housing Painting

This afternoon I painted the intake and exhaust manifolds, their mounting hardware, and the oil filter housing to make them all look new and original.
I had at least a half a can of Eastwood’s high temperature Factory Gray spray paint leftover from use on my roadster. This paint is designed to capture the appearance of new cast iron and is safe to up to 1,200 degrees so it is suitable for an exhaust manifold.

I masked off the threads of the studs for the intake manifold and started spraying. It came out pretty nice.

I also masked off the threaded studs on the intake manifold before painting.

I previously ordered a can of Al’s Datsun Engine Blue spray paint, which I’ve used with much success on Datsun engines and engine parts in the past. I bought this can on ebay, but I believe it is currently available from California Datsun’s website here.

The finished intake and exhaust manifolds:

Here are the manifold mounting washers, engine lifting bracket, and oil filter housing, which I previously cleaned up, prepped, and primed.

I sprayed them with the same Datsun blue engine paint, since I found traces of that color on each of the parts, suggesting that was their original color.